Signum Mortis

Gangs of Rome

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Signum Mortis is a game for 3 to 6 players lasting between 3 to 5 hours aimed at more mature gamers. Players take the role of Masters of Roman Gangs from the Aventine Hill during Sulla’s reign of terror and proscription of 82 BC.

On one hand the players are building a reputation for their Gang competing for being the most daring in truly “headhunting” powerful men fallen into disgrace. Gangs capture - using brutal force or guile - outlawed (proscribed) but still highly influential Senators or other Nobles (whose heads will be displayed on the forum).

On the other hand, players also compete in their accumulation of wealth. They gain blood money for those captured while also plundering the homes of these unfortunates. The Gangs also raise money by extorting the grain merchants, gambling halls or brothels, while players might also prey on each other in an attempt to rob the other Gangs of their ill-gotten wealth either on the way home or by storming and plundering their lair.

Still, there are many dangers. Sulla’s veterans patrol the streets and in the Sullani, Sulla’s freedmen players have competitors as headhunters. Chrysogonus, Sulla’s man who leads this hunt wants his share of the booty, and the executioner will take the Master who lacked in generosity, while bribed Officials cause further trouble.

Players use their Chief and his three Lieutenants - all of them being specialists for different roles - and beef up their gangs by rogues lending numbers, muscles, speed or stealth. Players might also try bribing officials to influence the Civil War, steer the patrols or “ameliorate” their records with Chrysogonus while influencing the proscription lists. They use prophecies by the witch (“Stryga”) to influence their superstitious opponents.

When finally the unpredictable civil war ends and peace comes to Rome, also the Master whose gang has killed the – suddenly – wrong people will face the executioner, leaving the best tactician to survive and win.

YOU DO NOT BELIEVE IT WAS THAT BAD?
READ CICERO’S SPEECH FOR SEXTUS ROSCIUS ….